mapsontheweb:

The Great Lakes Drainage Basin — with political boundaries overlaid, the watershed for each lake is in a different color

mapsontheweb:

The Great Lakes Drainage Basin — with political boundaries overlaid, the watershed for each lake is in a different color

Reblogged 11 hours ago from mapsontheweb
94 notes
mapsontheweb:

Map of New York State stereotypes

mapsontheweb:

Map of New York State stereotypes

Reblogged 3 days ago from mapsontheweb
335 notes
New York over the years: http://sunlightfoundation.com/blog/2014/09/05/opengov-voices-mapping-city-boundary-change-over-time-with-open-data/

New York over the years: http://sunlightfoundation.com/blog/2014/09/05/opengov-voices-mapping-city-boundary-change-over-time-with-open-data/

Posted 4 days ago
2 notes
mapsontheweb:

112th US Congressional Districts coded by party.
Interactive version: http://maps.google.com/gallery/details?id=z4f-ZuCLmiKg.k0kWopafgkRA&hl=en

mapsontheweb:

112th US Congressional Districts coded by party.

Interactive version: http://maps.google.com/gallery/details?id=z4f-ZuCLmiKg.k0kWopafgkRA&hl=en

Reblogged 4 days ago from mapsontheweb
54 notes
Washington, D.C., is the first local government we identified as having an open data policy. The Office of the City Administrator issued a memorandum in 2006 listing certain datasets that were to be posted online in a timely manner to help the public better understand government activities and “become knowledgeable participants in improving the quality of life and promoting economic development in the city.”
DC’s open data policy is considered to be among the first in a long line of more than 40 such policies now in place in states and municipalities around the country. These policies have grown significantly beyond the vision outlined by DC’s 2006 memorandum, expanding to include strong oversight, clear timelines, and, perhaps most importantly, language about “setting the default to open” rather than just listing certain datasets to be posted online.
The evolution of open data policies since 2006 provides a chance for stakeholders to learn from and build on what’s been accomplished so far. This summer, a new executive directive from Mayor Vincent Gray’s office could have taken advantage of that opportunity for growth. It fell far short, however. The scope, level of detail, and enforceability of the policy seem to reveal a lack of seriousness about making a significant improvement on DC’s 2006 memorandum.
Read how DC missed an opportunity for improvement and what it can do next.

Washington, D.C., is the first local government we identified as having an open data policy. The Office of the City Administrator issued a memorandum in 2006 listing certain datasets that were to be posted online in a timely manner to help the public better understand government activities and “become knowledgeable participants in improving the quality of life and promoting economic development in the city.”

DC’s open data policy is considered to be among the first in a long line of more than 40 such policies now in place in states and municipalities around the country. These policies have grown significantly beyond the vision outlined by DC’s 2006 memorandum, expanding to include strong oversight, clear timelines, and, perhaps most importantly, language about “setting the default to open” rather than just listing certain datasets to be posted online.

The evolution of open data policies since 2006 provides a chance for stakeholders to learn from and build on what’s been accomplished so far. This summer, a new executive directive from Mayor Vincent Gray’s office could have taken advantage of that opportunity for growth. It fell far short, however. The scope, level of detail, and enforceability of the policy seem to reveal a lack of seriousness about making a significant improvement on DC’s 2006 memorandum.

Read how DC missed an opportunity for improvement and what it can do next.

Posted 5 days ago
2 notes
From The Washington Post 

From The Washington Post 

Posted 5 days ago
From Code for America: 

If you’re interested in Atlanta’s future, start exploring the Infrastructure Map and start a conversation. It’s your city to shape.
Read more: http://www.codeforamerica.org/blog/2014/09/09/mapping-infrastructure-atlanta/

From Code for America: 

If you’re interested in Atlanta’s future, start exploring the Infrastructure Map and start a conversation. It’s your city to shape.

Read more: http://www.codeforamerica.org/blog/2014/09/09/mapping-infrastructure-atlanta/

Posted 6 days ago
1 note
mapsontheweb:

Percent change in US population by county
Related: Population change in the United States between 2000-2010

mapsontheweb:

Percent change in US population by county

Related: Population change in the United States between 2000-2010

Reblogged 6 days ago from mapsontheweb
39 notes
Where are the baby boomers going to live? Read more on CityLab. 

Where are the baby boomers going to live? Read more on CityLab. 

Posted 1 week ago
1 note
time-for-maps:

The Most Popular eBay Item In Every State [1000 X 4049]

time-for-maps:

The Most Popular eBay Item In Every State [1000 X 4049]

Reblogged 1 week ago from time-for-maps
16 notes