Beyond business — the impacts of open data

When we’re talking with localities that are just beginning to learn about it, we find that it’s helpful to describe the benefits of opening government data in terms of broad categories. Recently, we’ve seen a number of great presentations on how open data can spur economic activity, and lists presenting the economic value of open data — like GovLab’s Open Data 500, Socrata’s Userbase and McKinsey & Company’s Open Data report — provide useful demonstrations of the ways that open data can produce economic benefits.

 

As an organization focused on opening government, we emphasize other facets of the open data story. The Sunlight Foundation is particularly interested in the way that open data helps to increase transparency, allowing people a closer view of the decisions and processes that elected officials undertake on behalf of the public. We’re also interested in the accountability that can be enabled by open data. Democratic governance improves when people have data that helps them see how officials are doing relative to past or promised performance.

 

While transparency and accountability are of special interest to us here at Sunlight, we generally also mention a few additional categories of benefit we’ve seen governments enjoy from opening their data. We’ve seen ways that open data can be used to identify new efficiencies within governments — a variety of benefit likely to be of interest to any official watching their government’s bottom line. We’ve seen open data employed as a way to evaluate and improve local service quality. Finally, we’ve seen open data used to enhance two-way communication between the public and their governments and to thereby increase public participation.

 

What are the effects of open data? Take a look at our new collection of examples and see for yourself.

 

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Read more on the Sunlight Foundation blog.

theatlanticcities:

People of color are disproportionately hurt by air pollution.

theatlanticcities:

People of color are disproportionately hurt by air pollution.

Reblogged 2 days ago from theatlanticcities
20 notes
datanews:

The NYPD has published precinct level traffic data for March. See how the number of tickets for dangerous moving violations given this year has changed compared to the same period in 2013 across precincts.

datanews:

The NYPD has published precinct level traffic data for March. See how the number of tickets for dangerous moving violations given this year has changed compared to the same period in 2013 across precincts.

Reblogged 2 days ago from datanews
16 notes
mapsontheweb:

Light map of USA, overlay with interstate routes and state boundaries.
More lights maps

mapsontheweb:

Light map of USA, overlay with interstate routes and state boundaries.

More lights maps

Reblogged 4 days ago from mapsontheweb
206 notes
More Friday city fun: local Starbucks data! 

More Friday city fun: local Starbucks data! 

Posted 5 days ago
102 notes
nycopendata:

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.
Reblogged from nychealth:
Noise in NYC
Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.
Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.
To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:
4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months. 
3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.
More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.
NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:
111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.
More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.
1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.
311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.
Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.
Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

nycopendata:

Curious to learn more about the noise complaints mentioned in the Health Department’s post? Visit New York City’s Open Data portal to view the 311 Service Request dataset, which includes 311 noise complaints from 2010 to present. 311 Service Request data from 2009 is also available on the Open Data portal.

Reblogged from nychealth:

Noise in NYC

Big cities like NYC are full of great sights, sounds …  and noises.

Ambient noise is the noise from traffic, construction, industrial or recreation activities, animals, or people’s voices, that someone doesn’t want to hear. Too much ambient noise can cause stress, higher blood pressure, and interference with sleep.

To gain a better understanding of ambient noise disturbance among all New Yorkers, a recent Community Health Survey asked adults about how often they were disrupted by noise within the previous three months and why. Here’s what we learned:

  • 4 in 10 New Yorkers reported having activities disrupted by noise from outside their homes at least once in the previous 3 months. 
  • 3 in 4 of New Yorkers experiencing frequent noise disruptions —about 828,000 New Yorkers—reported noise disruption 7 or more times per week.
  • More than half of all those reporting any noise disruption said they were disturbed by noise coming from traffic – noise from cars, trucks, or other vehicles, excluding emergency sirens – and about half said neighbors and emergency sirens caused their noise disruption.

NYC also tracks noise complaints through its 311 calling system. Of the 1,783,133 complaints to the 311 call system in 2009:

  • 111,730 (6%) of 311 calls were noise-related.
  • More than half of 311 noise complaints were related to noise from loud music and parties (34%) or other social environment causes (24%) such as noise from neighbors, loud talking, loud TV, alarms going off, ice cream trucks, or noise from ventilation units.
  • 1 out of 5 noise calls to 311 were to complain about traffic or transportation noise.
  • 311 complaint data show that residents of Manhattan disproportionally called about noise-related complaints in 2009.
  • Central Harlem-Morningside Heights, Chelsea-Village, and Union Square-Lower Manhattan were among the top five communities with the highest 311 noise-related calls rates as well as the highest prevalence of noise disruption, as reported to the Community Health Survey.

Want to learn more? Check out our new report for more NYC noise facts.

Reblogged 5 days ago from nycopendata
54 notes
Friday city fun: which park are you closest to? 

Friday city fun: which park are you closest to? 

Reblogged 5 days ago from thegreenurbanist
91 notes
The Internet as a subway map. 
Read about it here on Slate. 

The Internet as a subway map. 

Read about it here on Slate. 

Posted 1 week ago
1 note